Tarantino’s white supremacy claim shows who the real racists are … and it’s not who he thinks

Filmmaker Quentin Tarantino knows which side his bread is buttered on. His work —  face it — is good; it sells at the box office and earns much-deserved critical acclaim. So when early rumors surfaced about a rift between Tarantino over his anti-police comments and Harvey Weinstein, whose company has distributed Tarantino’s last half dozen or so films, it remained just that: a rumor.

On Tuesday, Weinstein broke his silence. A spokesman for The Weinstein Co. issued a statement via “The Hollywood Reporter” that read, “We don’t speak for Quentin; he can and should be allowed to speak for himself.”

As for “Quentin,” he has done more of just that. He appeared last night on MSNBC’s “All In with Chris Hayes.” The purpose of his appearance wasn’t to bury his claim that all police are murderers but to amplify on it. After expressing his “surprise” at the backlash to his anti-police invective, he doubled down on his original claim, stating that police brutality is “ultimately … a problem of white supremacy in this country.”

So for Tarantino, as for any liberal, all roads lead to the race card. But there’s a problem with imputing racism to all police interactions with crime suspects in which a suspect is hurt or dies. According to a report published in May by the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics about 27% of local police officers nationwide are members of a racial or ethnic minority. Approximately, 12%, or 58,000, are black.

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The percentage of “murderers” (aka police) implicated in one of those famous examples of “police brutality” in recent memory, the death of Freddie Gray, is much higher. Of the six officers charged in Gray’s death, three of them, or 50%, are black. The driver of the van in which Gray was  being transported, Caesar Goodson, is facing the stiffest punishment if convicted.

Does Tarantino believe that Goodson, who is black, is at heart a white supremacist? For that matter, does he believe that any of the 58,000 police nationwide who belong to an ethnic minority? And if he does, would he not concede that they must be dimwits?

Talk about your soft bigotry of low expectations!

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Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy has written for The Blaze, HotAir, NewsBusters, Weasel Zippers, Conservative Firing Line, RedCounty, and New York’s Daily News. He has one published novel, Hot Rain, (G. P. Putnam’s Sons), and has been a guest on Radio Vice Online with Jim Vicevich, The Alana Burke Show, Smart Life with Dr. Gina, and The George Espenlaub Show.