State Gambling Commission shuts down senior center’s penny ante poker

State Gambling Commission shuts down senior center’s penny ante poker

If you refuse to see lemonade stand closures as the first sign of an encroaching police state, maybe the latest crackdown will convince you. Seattle station KING5 reports that the state gaming commission has put the kibosh on a penny ante poker game at senior center in Snohomish, Wash.

As the video notes:

A not-so-high stakes game of pinochle was on at the center’s tables Tuesday. They’re playing for pennies, but betting with money is illegal in Snohomish. In December the State Gambling Commission ordered the games to stop.

The accompanying article explains that the city passed an ordinance five years ago to keep “for-profit gambling rooms” from opening. Obviously, the law was never meant to cover friendly games between seniors passing the time. But someone snitched on the old folk’s home, and the state had no choice.

“This is something we do to get together, keep our minds sharp and enjoy ourselves,” says Peter Richard, one of the law-breakers at the facility. “We should turn the card rooms into grow rooms for marijuana,” he quips. “Then we would be legal and make some money.”

The city council is now working to repeal the ordinance, even though taking that step will reopen the original can of worms.

“If you gave them an IQ test, the needle wouldn’t move,” said Bill Huested.

Bingo!


LU Staff

LU Staff

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