Video: ‘Grossest Super Bowl injury’ ever?

Video: ‘Grossest Super Bowl injury’ ever?

Anyone who follows football is talking this morning about what Seattle Times columnist Jerry Brewer called the “worst play call in Super Bowl history.” The play in question occurred with seconds left in the game. Seattle had the ball at the New England one-yard line. It was second down. Seattle boasts one of the best running backs in pro football in Marshawn Lynch. Instead of handing the ball off to Lynch and having him attempt to power it into the end zone for a win, the call from the bench was for Russell Wilson to pass, leading to a New England interception.

But another interception — one of two off Patriots’ quarterback Tom Brady — earlier in the game is also receiving some attention on social media. New England was deep in the red zone, threatening to score, when Brady lobbed the ball in the direction of Seahawks cornerback Jeremy Lane, who picked it.

But after advancing the ball a few yards, Lane was tackled by New England receiver Randy Edelman and came down “funny” (as they say) on his arm. Lane left the game with what the Sporting News tweeted was a bad looking arm injury:

It wasn’t until this morning that the full extent of the injury’s gravity was realized. Here is a video of the interception that includes a slow-motion replay in which Lane attempted to break his fall and instead broke his arm, mid-way up the forearm. (WARNING: Not for the squeamish.)

As one individual tweeted this morning: 

Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy has written for The Blaze, HotAir, NewsBusters, Weasel Zippers, Conservative Firing Line, RedCounty, and New York’s Daily News. He has one published novel, Hot Rain, (G. P. Putnam’s Sons), and has been a guest on Radio Vice Online with Jim Vicevich, The Alana Burke Show, Smart Life with Dr. Gina, and The George Espenlaub Show.


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