Carter at Hamas fundraiser: Use ‘principles of Allah’ to bring peace and justice (Video)

Carter at Hamas fundraiser: Use ‘principles of Allah’ to bring peace and justice (Video)
Carter snuggles with Hamas leader Khaled Meshaal. (Image via Breitbart)

On Saturday, Jimmy Carter delivered the keynote address, as scheduled, at the annual convention of the Islamic Society of North America in Detroit, which included a Gaza fundraiser.  The fundraiser was, just to be clear, raising funds which will end up being controlled by the terror group Hamas, ruler of the Gaza Strip.

Jimmy Carter is no stranger to Hamas, having met with its leader Khaled Meshaal multiple times since 2008.

Reportedly, Carter commanded “rapt” attention from many in the crowd.

According to the Detroit News, Carter spoke mostly about “preventing violence against women and girls, encouraging all present to fight for equal rights for both sexes.”

“One thing that all men can do is to be sure that you treat your wife as you would like to be treated yourself,” Carter said, amid cheers. “My hope is all Christians, all Muslims, all people of other faiths, even those who don’t have one, will join in this crusade to end the plight of our wives, our sisters, our daughters.”

Speaking earlier at a luncheon, however, Carter had more to say about foreign affairs – and that’s where the “peace and justice” allusion came up.

The former president detailed the work that his foundation, the Carter Center, does around the world. In addition to working to eradicate disease, promoting human rights and monitoring elections to make sure they are fair, Carter said a major role is to work for peace in the Middle East, a statement that earned him hearty applause.

“We continue to meet with the people in the Middle East to bring peace and justice to the people,” said Carter.

He said the Carter Center meets with parties that the U.S. Government or the U.N. won’t negotiate with. He said the goal has always been for Israel to withdraw from all occupied territories.

Fortunately, in Carter’s view, Islam has answers:

“We are all Americans in a system that allows basic human rights: peace, justice and the ability to treat each other as equals,” Carter told a crowd of about 1,000 who had paid $200 a plate to attend the fundraiser luncheon. “I hope all of you will use the principals [sic] of Allah to bring peace and justice to all.”

Carter didn’t neglect Muslim victimization themes stateside.

The former President said his foundation has been working to assure fair treatment for Muslims, Arab Americans and all people who may have been persecuted after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in 2001, calling the government’s response “a miscarriage of justice.”

Carter’s posture on these issues has been well known for many years, partly due to his close connections with Clarence Jordan (the uncle of Carter’s long-time aide Hamilton Jordan) and Jordan’s Koinonia Farm, which sells and sponsors performances of Jordan’s “Cotton Patch Gospel” translation of the gospels and epistles of the New Testament.

In a flight of supreme tendentiousness, the translated, vernacularized gospels depict the religious Pharisees of Jesus’ time as white slave-owners from the ante-bellum South, and the non-Jews of ancient Judea in the role of black slaves.  Unsurprisingly, Koinonia Farm’s positions on “peace and justice” issues represent a laundry list of radical leftism.

Jimmy Carter remains weirdly out of the American mainstream, in these and many other regards.  Video from his speech at the ISNA convention on 30 August 2014:

(H/t: Gateway Pundit.)

J.E. Dyer

J.E. Dyer

J.E. Dyer is a retired Naval Intelligence officer who lives in Southern California, blogging as The Optimistic Conservative for domestic tranquility and world peace. Her articles have appeared at Hot Air, Commentary’s Contentions, Patheos, The Daily Caller, The Jewish Press, and The Weekly Standard.


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