IRS demands of pro-lifers: 'Detail the content of your prayers' (Video)

IRS demands of pro-lifers: 'Detail the content of your prayers' (Video)

irsSo many IRS Agents… so few Divine Smitings.

During today’s House Ways and Means Committee hearings on the ever-growing Internal Revenue Service scandal, it was revealed that the IRS demanded that an Iowa pro-life group surrender the content of its prayers.

Illinois Republican Rep. Aaron Schock asked the still-serving Acting Commissioner Steven Miller specifically about the Iowa-based Campaign for Life of Iowa letter from the IRS 2009:

Schock: Would that be an inappropriate question to a 501(c)3 applicant… the content of one’s prayers?

Miller: It pains me to say I can’t speak to that one either.

Schock: You don’t know whether or not that would be an appropriate question to ask?

Miller: Speaking outside of this case, which I don’t know anything about, it would surprise me that that question was asked.

During the course of the hearing, it was also established that the same Hawkeye pro-lifers were instructed to reveal exceptionally private information regarding their group prayers. Here are some of the questions they were asked:

Please explain how all of your activities, including the prayer meetings held outside of Planned Parenthood, are considered educational as defined under 501(c)(3).

Organizations exempt under 501(c)(3) may present opinions with scientific or medical facts.

Please explain in detail the activities at these prayer meetings.

Also, please provide the percentage of time your organizations spends on prayer groups as compared with the other activities of the organization.


T. Kevin Whiteman

T. Kevin Whiteman

T. Kevin Whiteman is a retired Master Sergeant of Marines. He is the founder of the blog Unapologetically Rude and has written for Examiner and other blogs.

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