What difference does it make?

What difference does it make?

Hillary ClintonFormer Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, as readers may remember, famously asked this question when she testified before Congress last January. She used it to deflect questions about the attack on the U.S. installation in Benghazi that left four U.S. officials dead, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.

The State Department is nothing if not consistent.

Her successor, John Kerry, asked about Benghazi on April 17, told the House Foreign Affairs Committee:

I don’t think anybody lied to anybody. And let’s find out exactly, together, what happened, because we need — we got a lot more important things to move on to and get done.

You, like Clinton and Kerry, may ask why I’m dredging up this old news – since we have more important things to do. Well, that’s because it’s not old, nor is it unimportant.

Here we are, after another terror attack, waiting to hear from our government. Since the latest attack happened on U.S. soil and domestic law enforcement agencies are investigating it, we’ll learn much more than we did about the attack in Libya. Nevertheless, how will we trust what the federal government officials tell us? Will we get a similar brush-off at some point, for example when it comes to explaining the motivations of the terrorists? For example, whether Islamism inspired them to blow up and maim innocent people? We certainly never got a straight story on that after the 2009 Fort Hood massacre.

Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA) claims a number of whistleblowers have come forward to tell the House Oversight Committee more about what actually happened in Benghazi. This should be interesting. I wonder how the CIA, State, or others will try to destroy their credibility…regarding that ancient, unimportant incident.


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