Another first for Vermont: Voters nominate first transgender major-party gubernatorial candidate

Another first for Vermont: Voters nominate first transgender major-party gubernatorial candidate
Christine Hallquist (Image: YouTube screen grab)

It’s the political version of seeing how many marbles you can fit in your mouth. Yesterday, we brought you the story of a candidate for Vermont governor who meets all the qualifications to run for the office, including the minimum-age qualification. Ethan Sonneborn’s age? Thirteen. The minimum age for candidacy? There isn’t any.

Now comes the latest marble: a transgender candidate for governor of the Green Mountain State. In fact, the nation’s first transgender candidate period.

The New York Times reports that Christine Hallquist eked out a victory in a field of four Democrats, pulling 48% percent of the vote. Ms. Hallquist, who used to be Mr. Hallquist, will face off against Republican incumbent Phil Scott in November’s general election.

According to the Times, in preparing for “her” candidacy, Hallquist sought the advice of Danica Roem, “the Virginia state delegate who won national recognition when she became the first transgender person elected to her state’s Legislature.”

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Roem’s advice had nothing to do with gender identity. Try a light, rhythmic knock. Leave a handwritten note with campaign literature if no one is home.

In other words, try a “woman’s touch.”

So what are some of the planks in Hallquist’s platform? She is running primarily on climate change and rural development. She has also called for statewide single-payer healthcare and universal internet. Your more or less basic liberal stuff.

As for the number of marbles in Vermont’s mouth, about the only shade missing is black. Despite the claim in VermontBiz that black Americans are better off in Vermont than in most states, Vermont has the third smallest black population of any state in the union with 0.98%. Whites make up the largest percentage of Vermonters with 94.1%.

LU Staff

LU Staff

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