Video: Massive egg hunt gets scrambled in Sacramento

Participants in an aspiring “world record egg hunt” in Sacramento got more than they bargained for this weekend.

Blue Heart International hosted the egg hunt, which featured 500,000 eggs.  As you might expect with an egg hunt that size, the eggs themselves were apparently not at all hard to find.  They appear to have been bunched up in big groups lying out in the open for the juvenile egg-hunters.

But there were reportedly special prizes among the eggs, and that’s where things started to go sour:

[M]any parents left the Easter egg hunt furious, claiming the family-friendly event took a less-than-festive turn.

“There was no organization at all, they all trampled each other. Little two and three year olds were crying. The parents were scooping up all of the eggs for their kids and it was horrible,” said mother Tessa Moon.

Parents reportedly rushed onto the grass and started pushing and cursing at other children in order to get their hands on eggs and special prizes.

According to CBS in Sacramento, the hunt didn’t make it into the record books, in spite of its impressive egg total.

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LU Staff

LU Staff

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