Texas newspaper plans to publish names, addresses of police officers

Texas newspaper plans to publish names, addresses of police officers
Antronie Scott (left) and Stephanie Zarriello (credit: Police photo, KENS screen grab)

What could possibly go wrong?

Here in an era where police across the country have been branded the enemy and innocent officers have already been brutally murdered, a newspaper in Texas has decided to publish the names and addresses of every member of the San Antonio police force.

According to Fox News, the tipping point for Stephanie Zarriello, publisher of the “San Antonio Observer,” was the shooting last week of a black man described as being in “a position of surrender.” The bullet that ended the life of 36-year-old Antronie Scott was fired by John Lee, a 10-year veteran of the force.

In a press conference held on behalf of Scott’s survivors, Zarriello said:

Like Ku Klux Klansman with hoods, [officers] do everything they can in order to protect their identities for fear of being brought to justice.

Just as the names and addresses of sex offenders are publicized in order to protect the public from their wicked behavior, we feel that our community has the right to the exact same level of protection.

The story of Scott’s fatal encounter with police does not appear to be as cut and dried as in Zarriello telling of it. Police Chief William McManus, explained that on the night of the shooting, undercover officers were tailing Scott, who was wanted for felony warrants.

As Scott exited his white Mercedes, an officer reportedly told him to show his hands. When Scott quickly turned around, an officer fired one shot, striking Scott in the chest and killing him…. McManus reportedly said the investigation to date has revealed that Scott was not armed and was holding a cellphone when the officer fired his weapon.

The investigation, McManus added, is ongoing.

Even if Zarriello’s characterization of the incident were 100% in concert with the official account, her actions will only serve to rile up the black community and could lead to another “revenge” killing similar to the one that occurred in a Houston suburb last August. In that instance, Deputy Darren Goforth was fueling up his patrol car when Shannon Miles, walked up behind him and fired 15 shots into the back of Goforth’s head. As best as authorities have been able to surmise, Miles singled out Goforth, a total stranger to him, purely on the basis of his police uniform.

Ben Bowles

Ben Bowles

Ben Bowles is a freelance writer.


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