Picture of the Day: Judge gives shoplifter unusual sentence, could be strong crime deterrent

Call it the present-day equivalent of the scarlet letter. First Coast News has the story (h/t The Blaze):

A woman was ordered by a judge to hold a sign telling the world she stole from a local merchant as part of her punishment.

Deputies say 21-year-old Tia Grissett and 23-year-old Isaac Simmons attempted to steal two air purifiers from a Wal-Mart Supercenter located at 14500 S. U.S. HWY 301 in April.

A Loss Prevention officer noticed Grissett and Simmons loading two boxes of new air purifiers into their vehicle. The officer asked them if they had a receipt for the items. They told the officer they did not have a receipt because they were attempting to return the items, according a report from the Starke Police Department.

Surveillance video was the ultimate arbiter. The pair of thieves was arrested and each was charged with larceny. The total value of the merchandise was more than $300.

Grissett pleaded guilty. Grissett was sentenced to 18 months’ probation and, of course, the requirement that she hold aloft in public the sign shown below. (The article does not specify the specific terms of the arrangement, nor does it provide any details of the fate of Simmons.)

Sign and punishment

The story calls to mind a similar incident that I reported on at Hot Air in 2012 regarding a Fort Wayne mother whose 14-year-old son was habitually in trouble. The video tells the rest:

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Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy has written for The Blaze, HotAir, NewsBusters, Weasel Zippers, Conservative Firing Line, RedCounty, and New York’s Daily News. He has one published novel, Hot Rain, (G. P. Putnam’s Sons), and has been a guest on Radio Vice Online with Jim Vicevich, The Alana Burke Show, Smart Life with Dr. Gina, and The George Espenlaub Show.


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