NYC restaurant has no-talking policy

NYC restaurant has no-talking policy
Silent meals at military academies supposedly builds character.
Silent meals at military academies supposedly builds character.

Shut up and eat — literally.

If you’re looking for idle chatter or any other kind of verbal interaction with your dining companions, eat somewhere other than Eat, a restaurant in Brooklyn’s trendy Greenpoint section. Mum’s the word once you’re at table.

So how golden is silence? How does $40 four courses of organic, locally sourced food sound (or how would it sound if you were permitted to speak)?

If it appeals — and how couldn’t it in a jaded market like New York? — you’re advised to plan ahead. The restaurant’s website notes that seats fill up quickly.

According to MyFoxNY, the “no-talking” meals are not a daily occurrence but the occasional flight of fancy at the restaurant. Eat’s chef, Nicholas Nauman, was inspired to offer silent dining after spending time with Buddhist monks in India. He says “the silence allows customers a chance to better experience the food.”

But not the chance to talk about it in progress. Or presumably to consult with the staff on what exactly you are eating, although one guesses that people with food allergies will make their needs known ahead of time or choose a restaurant where the sound is on.

The article quotes Epicurious.com Editor-in-Chief Tanya Steel, who notes that silent dining is another facet of sensory-depravation eating-out fad. The reference is to restaurants that offer “dark dining,” meals where the guests are blindfolded and/or the lights are turned out.

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Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy has written for The Blaze, HotAir, NewsBusters, Weasel Zippers, Conservative Firing Line, RedCounty, and New York’s Daily News. He has one published novel, Hot Rain, (G. P. Putnam’s Sons), and has been a guest on Radio Vice Online with Jim Vicevich, The Alana Burke Show, Smart Life with Dr. Gina, and The George Espenlaub Show.

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