Seaborne imports soar; ships stuck as L.A. ports can’t unload containers fast enough

Seaborne imports soar; ships stuck as L.A. ports can’t unload containers fast enough
Port of Long Beach container terminal. Wikipedia: By Charles Csavossy - http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/newsroom/multimedia/photo_gallery/afc/field_ops/inspectors_seaports/cs_photo32.xml, Public Domain, Link

[Ed. – Imports aren’t soaring “because COVID”; they’re soaring because economy-killing regulations and lockdown policies.  Americans would love to produce such “popular imports” as “furniture, auto parts, clothes, electronics, and plastics.”  Not being allowed to is the problem.  Ships anchored uselessly off the coast, as a transportation infrastructure problem, isn’t nearly as explanatory as recognizing this as a policy-is-killing-manufacturing problem.  Note the word in bold.]

A supply-chain crisis is quietly brewing off the coast of Southern California as massive freighters wait for dock space to open up.

California ports in Los Angeles and Long Beach account for about one-third of US imports. These ports operate as a primary source of imports from China and have been heavily congested for months.

On Wednesday, 21 ships were anchored off the coast waiting for a spot to open up to unload at Los Angeles and Long Beach ports, according to data from the Marine Exchange of Southern California. …

Trending: Reports: China seeks forward bases in Pacific and Atlantic Oceans

The ships carry millions of dollars worth of popular imports, including furniture, auto parts, clothes, electronics, and plastics, according to data from the Port of Los Angeles. Supplies of these materials could be heavily depleted in the US due to the backlog of ships.

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