Report shows bail reform increases crime, though it ignores its own logic to claim the reverse

Report shows bail reform increases crime, though it ignores its own logic to claim the reverse

[Ed. – Constant recidivism factor plus more released defendants equals increased crime.  (And crime has increased, so it tracks.]

A recent report confirms, however inadvertently, that Cook County’s controversial limits on the use of cash bail caused more crime on the streets of Chicago and resulted in fewer defendants showing up in court. A close look at the analysis from Loyola University’s Don Stemen and David Olson—though it purports to show the opposite—makes clear that bail-reform skeptics were right to worry about how policies like Chicago’s would affect public safety and criminal justice.

The reform in question took effect in 2017, when Cook County Circuit Court Chief Judge Timothy Evans required that judges not mandate cash bail unless strong reason existed to do so …

[I]f 500 additional people were released under the order, and the same share of released individuals reoffended, then the total number of crimes in Chicago would necessarily rise. …

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The new report offers another strike against Chicago’s reform: it caused more offenders to fail to appear for trial.

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