Russian maritime patrol planes off northern Alaska again; monitoring Arctic exercise

Russian maritime patrol planes off northern Alaska again; monitoring Arctic exercise
RCAF CF-18 intercepts a Russian Tu-142 "Bear F" in the Beaufort Sea, north of Alaska, on 9 March 2020. USAF and RCAF fighters kept the Russian pair under escort during their 4-hour mission in the U.S. (Alaska) ADIZ. NORAD image

[Ed. – The good news is, we’re back to the proper standard of 100% escort while they’re in the ADIZ or within weapons range of a potential U.S/Canadian target.  Although the Tu-142 is an old airframe, and antisubmarine warfare (ASW) capabilities haven’t been updated that much, the monitoring pairs dispatched by the Russians may have reasonably good luck in the cold, relatively still waters of the Beaufort Sea.  It’s been a long time since we had to deal with them coming this close.  See map at earlier headline.]

After Russian reconnaissance aircraft came within 45 miles of the coast of Alaska on Saturday, the commanding general of the joint U.S.–Canada North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) said they are seeing repeated incursions into the Alaskan Air Defense Identification Zone, known as ADIZ.

F-22 fighters assigned to NORAD were scrambled to intercept two pairs of Russian Tu-142 that entered the ADIZ from the west and the north of Alaska. One pair of Russian aircraft spent about four hours in the zone near a spot where the U.S. Navy was conducting submarine operations in the Arctic, NORAD officials said.

Continue reading →

Comments

For your convenience, you may leave commments below using Disqus. If Disqus is not appearing for you, please disable AdBlock to leave a comment.