Kentucky Supreme Court rules for T-shirt printer who declined LGBT-content job

Kentucky Supreme Court rules for T-shirt printer who declined LGBT-content job
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[Ed. – The basis on which Alliance Defending Freedom argued the case is exactly the right one. It’s not about the sexual orientation of the customer (which the vendor often has no reason to know), nor is it about whether the vendor is being asked to “participate” in something. It’s about the content of expression, and whether it can be COMPELLED from the vendor by law.]

On Nov. 1, the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled in favor of Christian print-shop owner Blaine Adamson, who was sued for refusing to print “gay-pride” T-shirts for the Lexington Pride Festival. …

The court ruled (6-0) that GLSO had no standing because under discrimination law in Kentucky, such claims can only be filed by individuals and not organizations. GLSO lost at the initial trial, the appeals court and now at the supreme court. …

According to Kentucky Supreme Court Justice David Buckingham,  there were three “essentials” that explain why the court sided with Adamson. First, Hands On had a precedent of declining orders based on the message regardless of who placed the order.

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The second point was that Hands On Originals had previously accepted the request to print shirts for a lesbian singer; and third, Adamson did not know the sexual orientation of the person who requested the order on behalf of the GLSO.

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