Climate change is affecting soccer, how athletes perform and the fan experience

Climate change is affecting soccer, how athletes perform and the fan experience
Image: Sergey Nivens/Shutterstock

[Ed. – Oh, the humanity!]

The record heat wave sweeping through Europe sent daytime temperatures above 100 degrees Fahrenheit last week in France as soccer players squared off in the quarterfinals of the FIFA Women’s World Cup.

Temperatures soared even higher during the concurrent Africa Cup of Nations in Egypt.

One player for Nigeria was hospitalized and missed his team’s first game after collapsing during a training session due to “severe dehydration,” according to his former soccer club. The heat also sparked a dispute between the Moroccan coach and referees over a lack of water breaks.

Trending: First (possibly last) look at founders of newly ‘liberated city’ in Colorado

The tournaments underscore the fact that climate change is changing soccer, affecting where and when games are played, how athletes perform, and the fan experience.

“Playing in heat has always been a part of it,” said Mary Harvey, executive director of the Centre for Sport and Human Rights. “But now things are changing.”

Continue reading →

Comments

For your convenience, you may leave commments below using Disqus. If Disqus is not appearing for you, please disable AdBlock to leave a comment.