MSNBC panelist claims ‘religious liberty’ is rooted in history of ‘slave holder religion’

MSNBC panelist claims ‘religious liberty’ is rooted in history of ‘slave holder religion’
Robert Jones (left), Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove (Image: MSNBC video screen grab)

[Ed. – Miraculous how everything harks back to slavery and racism.]

On Sunday, panelists on MSNBC’s AM Joy attacked Attorney General Jeff Sessions and his defense of religious liberty in the United States. Without question or dissent, Sessions was condemned in the harshest of terms.

Host Joy Reid asked Minister Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove about his position that defending religious liberty is really only defending conservative Christians. He claimed: “I think this way that religious freedom is being framed is rooted in the history of slave holder religion and the way in the 20th century that it tried to justify discrimination.”

Robert Jones of the Public Religion Research Institute argued that cases such as Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission have, “echos of lunch counter, you know, refusals and businesses turning away African-Americans.”

Jones reiterated Wilson-Hartgrove’s point on religious liberty, saying: “[Sessions] talks about protecting people of faith. But I want to sharpen that up a little bit because when Sessions says protecting people of faith, what he really means is conservative white Christians and particularly white evangelical Christians.” He claimed that such people are an “outlier,” and he said that “White evangelical Protestants are the only religious group now that opposes same-sex marriage in the country.”

Continue reading →

For your convenience, you may leave commments below using either the Spot.IM commenting system or the Facebook commenting system. If Spot.IM is not appearing for you, please disable AdBlock to leave a comment.


Commenting Policy

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.