Voting machine vendor admits in letter to senator it put remote-access software on machines

Voting machine vendor admits in letter to senator it put remote-access software on machines

[Ed. – There’s no indication here that this means anything about cyber attempts against state voter registration databases — a different animal — in 2016.  But it’s still significant.  Read the article.  It’s not just the “top vendor,” ES&S.  It’s all of them.  That point is buried down the article, but it’s there.  The 2000-06 timeframe appears to be when this was first happening.  The purpose was to facilitate troubleshooting, and in theory, only the vendor’s trusted people should have had access to the machines by that method.  But, of course, having the software on the machines and connecting them to a remote computer would make them vulnerable to hacking.]

The nation’s top voting machine maker has admitted in a letter to a federal lawmaker that the company installed remote-access software on election-management systems it sold over a period of six years, raising questions about the security of those systems and the integrity of elections that were conducted with them.

In a letter sent to Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) in April and obtained recently by Motherboard, Election Systems and Software acknowledged that it had “provided pcAnywhere remote connection software … to a small number of customers between 2000 and 2006,” which was installed on the election-management system ES&S sold them.

The statement contradicts what the company told me and fact checkers for a story I wrote for the New York Times in February.

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