Plutonium stolen from private vehicle in San Antonio in 2017 is still missing

Plutonium stolen from private vehicle in San Antonio in 2017 is still missing
Where not to park your plutonium. Google image

[Ed. – Alt headline: “Idiots leave interesting-looking cases containing plutonium and cesium in back seat of car in hotel parking lot overnight.”  There have to already be better security protocols for transporting this stuff.  There just have to be.  There wouldn’t be nearly enough plutonium to weaponize effectively in this situation, but the whole article on nuclear material security around the world – a rather long one – is worth the read.]

Two security experts from the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory drove to San Antonio, Texas, in March 2017 with a sensitive mission: to retrieve dangerous nuclear materials from a nonprofit research lab there.

Their task was to ensure that the radioactive materials did not fall into the wrong hands on the way back to Idaho, where the government maintains a stockpile of nuclear explosive materials for the military and others.

To ensure they got the right items, the specialists from Idaho brought radiation detectors and small samples of dangerous materials to calibrate them: specifically, a plastic-covered disk of plutonium, a material that can be used to fuel nuclear weapons, and another of cesium, a highly radioactive isotope that could potentially be used in a so-called “dirty” radioactive bomb.

But when they stopped at a Marriott hotel just off Highway 410, in a high-crime neighborhood filled with temp agencies and ranch homes, they left those sensors on the back seat of their rented Ford Expedition. When they awoke the next morning, the window had been smashed and the special valises holding these sensors and nuclear materials had vanished.

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