CT lawmakers pass measure to give electoral votes to presidential candidate who wins popular vote

CT lawmakers pass measure to give electoral votes to presidential candidate who wins popular vote

[Ed. – Connecticut is the eleventh state to sign on to the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPVIC), an agreement for states to award all their electoral votes to whichever presidential candidate wins the overall popular vote in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. How could this possibly be constitutional? Better still, how happy will Dems be if one of their own candidates loses a presidential election because of it?]

The Connecticut state House passed a measure Thursday that would give the state’s electoral votes to the presidential candidate who won the popular vote, if enough states promise to do the same.

The bill would have the state join an interstate compact that grants participating states’ votes to candidates who wins the popular vote, the Hartford Courant reported.

However, the compact doesn’t go into effect until enough states join for the group to have 270 electoral votes – the amount a presidential candidate must earn to win the Electoral College.

Ten states have joined the group so far, representing a total of 165 electoral votes.

Support for the compact grew after both President Trump and former President George W. Bush won the Electoral College but lost the popular vote.

The measure to join the interstate compact passed the Connecticut state House 77-73, largely along party lines. Three conservative Democrats voted against the measure, and only one Republican supported it, according to the Courant.

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