TV execs scramble to stop plummeting NFL ratings, consider canceling Thursday night games

TV execs scramble to stop plummeting NFL ratings, consider canceling Thursday night games

[Ed. – Yeah, the problem is ‘over-saturation’ of football on TV. Interesting that problem never came up before Kaepernick and his legions of ‘The Oppressed’ began making asses of themselves during the playing of the national anthem.]

Network executives are scrambling to solve the growing problem of crashing ratings for the National Football League, by cutting games to end the perceived “over-saturation” of football on TV.

To put an end to the sliding ratings, the executives are proposing that fewer games may be the ticket to stop that “over-saturation,” with one idea being to cut Thursday Night Football by a whopping ten games.

The idea to trim Thursday Night Football from 18 games a season to only eight was first reported by Sports Business Journal and was part of a plan to reverse the ratings crash that also includes pulling games played in the U.K. back to 1 PM eastern time (6PM London time).

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Indeed the amount of football on TV has exploded in the last decade.

“Ten years ago, the NFL had 32 game windows through week six,” SBJ reported. “This year, it is up to 39, a 22 percent increase. It’s even more crowded in college, where the 2007 windows to this point added up to 105. This year, it’s at 179, up a whopping 71 percent.”

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