Lawsuit demands answers on the one thing we’ve never had an environmental impact study for

Lawsuit demands answers on the one thing we’ve never had an environmental impact study for

[Ed. – With immigrants and their children representing 20% of the U.S. population — 60 million people, if the U.S.-born children who wouldn’t otherwise be here are included — this is not an uninteresting question.  Healthy populations naturally grow anyway, but not nearly as fast as they grow with constant, and increasing, immigration.  Environmental alarmists who worry about human impact would be very inconsistent to assume away the most systematic form of impact on America in the last half century:  increasing waves of immigration.]

Congress passed a law in 1969 known as NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) and it has been used extensively and with a heavy hand to regulate development in almost every area of our economy. A central feature of the law is the provision requiring that any proposed governmental action that affects the environment be examined through public comment and hearings to assure its benefits outweigh any adverse impact on the environment. Federal agencies must conduct “Environmental Impact Assessments” before implementing any new action or program.

Even the Pentagon and every branch of the military has to comply with NEPA in its programs and operations. And yet, since 1970, not one federal agency — not the predecessor to the U.S. Customs and Immigration Service, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), nor the Environmental Protection Agency, the Forest Service, the Centers for Disease Control, the Federal Highway Administration, nor the Public Health Service — not a single federal agency has ever complied with the mandates of the NEPA with respect to its immigration-related programs and activities.

Continue reading →


Commenting Policy

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.

You may use HTML in your comments. Feel free to review the full list of allowed HTML here.