FBI: 89% more police officers killed in line of duty in 2014

FBI: 89% more police officers killed in line of duty in 2014
(Image via Predictable History, Unpredictable Past)

According to new statistics and data released today by the FBI, police shootings were up 89 percent in 2014 one officer was killed with his own gun.

Preliminary statistics released today by the FBI show that 51 law enforcement officers were feloniously killed in the line of duty in 2014. This is an increase of almost 89 percent when compared to the 27 officers killed in 2013. (Note: From 1980–2014, an average of 64 law enforcement officers have been feloniously killed per year. The 2013 total, 27, was the lowest during this 35-year period.) By region, 17 officers died as a result of criminal acts that occurred in the South, 14 officers in the West, eight officers in the Midwest, eight in the Northeast, and four in Puerto Rico.

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Thirty-five of the slain officers were confirmed to be wearing body armor at the times of the incidents. …

The FBI notes final statistics will be available in the fall as part of the Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted report publication.

Over the weekend, two police officers were killed in Mississippi during a routine traffic stop. In January, Flagstaff Police Officer Tyler Stewart, who was just 24-years-old, was killed during a domestic violence call. In December, NYPD Police Officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjuan Liu were ambushed while eating lunch in their patrol car. These are just a few recent examples, there are many more.

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