NYT flat-out lies about NRA convention – and uses lie to accuse NRA of hypocrisy

NYT flat-out lies about NRA convention – and uses lie to accuse NRA of hypocrisy

The NRA Convention starts today, in Nashville, Tennessee. And so, rather predictably, the New York Times has started its day by lying about it. Per the Times’s editorial board:

Seventy-thousand people are expected to attend the National Rifle Association’s convention opening on Friday in Tennessee, and not one of them will be allowed to come armed with guns that can actually shoot. After all the N.R.A. propaganda about how “good guys with guns” are needed to be on guard across American life, from elementary schools to workplaces, the weekend’s gathering of disarmed conventioneers seems the ultimate in hypocrisy.

There will be plenty of weapons in evidence at the hundreds of display booths, but for convention security the firing pins must be removed. …

This is completely and utterly wrong. In fact, anyone with a permit valid in Tennessee can “come armed with guns that actually shoot.” As the Tennessean confirms:

The National Rifle Association and the Music City Center have confirmed that gun owners with the proper carry permits can bring their guns with them into the center during the association’s convention, which will be held there this weekend. …

[T]he only guns that will have their firing pins removed are those that are presented for examination within the convention’s attendant trade show. This is standard practice…because the trade show guns are not for sale; they are not there to be fired; and they cannot be removed from their display cases.

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