Cubans happier with their political system than Americans are

Cubans happier with their political system than Americans are

[Ed. – What’s Spanish for “Potemkin”?  Is “enterrar el Lede” a Thing in Spanish?]

Judging from the press coverage, there was one clear takeaway froma historic poll of Cuban public opinion published Wednesday: President Barack Obama is nearly twice as popular on the island as aging revolutionary Fidel Castro. But the more surprising finding, perhaps, was Cubans’ general satisfaction with their communist system—as much as Americans are with their democracy, and in some cases even more so.

According to a January 2014 Gallup poll, 65 percent of Americans are “dissatisfied with the nation’s system of government and how well it works.” Meanwhile, 52 percent of Cubans are dissatisfied with their political system, according to the new poll by Univision/Fusion.

More than two-thirds of Cubans—68 percent—are satisfied with their health care system. About 66 percent of Americans said the same in a November 2014 Gallup poll.

Seventy-two percent of Cubans are satisfied with their education system, while an August 2014 Gallup poll found that less than half of Americans—48 percent—are “completely” or “somewhat” satisfied with the quality of K-12 education. (Americans’ satisfaction increases to 75 percent when asked about their own children’s education.) …

[But wait!  There’s more.  Emphasis added. – Ed.]

Of the 55 percent of Cubans who want to emigrate to another country, slightly more than half of them would like that country to be the U.S.

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