US electricity price hits all-time per-kilowatt high

US electricity price hits all-time per-kilowatt high

[Ed. – Note at the original post when electricity prices began climbing.  It was when the US handed the keys of the economy over to environmental extremists, in the early 1970s.]

For the first time ever, the average price for a kilowatthour (KWH) of electricity in the United States has broken through the 14-cent mark, climbing to a record 14.3 cents in June, according to data released last week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Before this June, the highest the average price for a KWH had ever gone was 13.7 cents, the level it hit in June, July, August and September of last year.

The 14.3-cents average price for a KWH recorded this June is about 4.4 percent higher than that previous record.

Although the price for an average KWH hit its all-time record in June, the seasonally adjusted electricity price index–which measures changes in the price of electricity relative to a value of 100 and adjusts for seasonal fluctuations in price–hit its all-time high of 209.341 in March of this year, according to BLS. In June, it was slightly below that level, at 209.144.

Back in June 1984, the seasonally adjusted price index for electricity was 103.9—less than half what it was in June 2014.

Electricity prices have not always risen in the United States. The BLS has published an annual electricity price index dating back to 1913. It shows that from that year through 1947, the price of electricity in the United States generally trended down, with the index dropping from 45.5 in 1913 to 26.6 in 1947.

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