Safe spaces and ‘ze’ badges: My bewildering year at a U.S. university

Safe spaces and ‘ze’ badges: My bewildering year at a U.S. university
A student die-in at Portland State (Image: Screen grab of VidMax video via Campus Reform)

[Ed. – This piece in a sense answers the hypothetical question ‘If visitors from another planet came to earth, what would their impression of ____?’ In this case the blank is filled in by ‘political correctness as it is practiced at America’s institutions of higher learning.’ The results follow in part:]

As a child in Glasgow, I learned that sticks and stones might break my bones but words didn’t really hurt. I’m now at New York University studying journalism, where a different mantra seems to apply. Words, it turns out, might cause life-ruining emotional trauma.

During my ‘Welcome Week’, for example, I was presented with a choice of badges indicating my preferred gender pronouns: ‘he’, ‘she’, ‘they’ or ‘ze’?

The student in front of me, an Australian, found this hilarious: ‘Last time I checked, I was a girl.’ Her joke was met with stony silence. Later I realised why: expressing bewilderment at the obsession with pronouns might count as a ‘micro-aggression’. Next stop, ‘transphobia’.

It was soon obvious to my fellow students that I was not quite with the programme. In a class discussion early in my first semester, I made the mistake of mentioning that I believed in objective standards in art. Some art is great, some isn’t, I said; not all artists are equally talented. This was deemed an undemocratic opinion and I was given a nickname: the cultural fascist. I’ve tried to take it affectionately.

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