IT forensics suggest DNC files were copied locally – not via remote intrusion over Internet

IT forensics suggest DNC files were copied locally – not via remote intrusion over Internet

[Ed. – In other words, if this guy is right, there was no hack.  The DNC files that were published by “Guccifer 2.0” were heisted from someone with access, in direct contact with a DNC computer, using a USB flash drive.  Notably, the date of the big data-copy was 7/5/2016, five days before Seth Rich was found shot — and later died — near his Capitol Hill home.  H/t: Gateway Pundit.]

This study analyzes the file metadata found in a 7zip archive file, 7dc58-ngp-van.7z, attributed to the Guccifer 2.0 persona.    For an in depth analysis of various aspects of the controversy surrounding Guccifer 2.0, refer to Adam Carter’s blog, Guccifer 2.0: Game Over.

Based on the analysis that is detailed below, the following key findings are presented:

  • On 7/5/2016 at approximately 6:45 PM Eastern time, someone copied the data that eventually appears on the “NGP VAN” 7zip file (the subject of this analysis).  This 7zip file was published by a persona named Guccifer 2, two months later on September 13, 2016.
  • Due to the estimated speed of transfer (23 MB/s) calculated in this study, it is unlikely that this initial data transfer could have been done remotely over the Internet.
  • The initial copying activity was likely done from a computer system that had direct access to the data.  By “direct access” we mean that the individual who was collecting the data either had physical access to the computer where the data was stored, or the data was copied over a local high speed network (LAN). …
  • This initial copying activity was done on a system where Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) settings were in force. Most likely, the computer used to initially copy the data was located somewhere on the East Coast.

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