Report: Trump, Congress save $60B in reg. costs; leverage Obama’s shady implementation practices

Report: Trump, Congress save $60B in reg. costs; leverage Obama’s shady implementation practices

[Ed. – We wrote about this in January.  The beauty of rolling back regulations with the Congressional Review Act (CRA) is that it can be done without new legislation, if it’s within a certain window after the proposed regs have been submitted by federal agencies for public comment.  But Obama’s agencies stopped submitting a lot of their regs for comment in the last two years of his tenure.  So the CRA clock didn’t start on those regs until Trump took office.  Not all of the regs being rolled back fall into that category, of course.  But hoist-on-his-own-petard-wise, this one’s hard to beat.]

President Donald Trump and Congress have saved an additional $60 billion in regulatory costs by rolling back Obama administration rules, according to a new report.

The American Action Forum, a center-right policy institute, released a report Tuesday documenting the most recent ways the administration and Congress have used the Congressional Review Act to repeal regulations.

The report found the recent repeal and delay of regulations could lead to $86 billion in net fiscal effects for taxpayers from deregulation. …

Reversing the Obama administration’s “Waters of the United States” rule, the sweeping Environmental Protection Agency move that would have subjected lakes and ponds to federal government regulation, could produce $16 million in taxpayer savings alone.

Rolling back just five regulations could save taxpayers billions. The report examined spending implications of regulations repealed through the Congressional Review Act and those delayed formally by the administration.

“Combined, five regulations would have cost more than $86 billion in federal funds,” the report said. “Easily the largest rule was the Department of Education’s ‘Accountability and State Plans‘ final measure, implementing the ‘Every Student Succeeds Act.'”

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