Can coin dropped from Empire State Building really kill you? New book answers that and more

Can coin dropped from Empire State Building really kill you? New book answers that and more

From tumbling air conditioners to defective sidewalk grates to deli salad-bar tuna, there’s a random death potentially waiting around every corner in New York City.

Who could blame locals for having a morbid curiosity about some of the more unusual ways to bite it? For those people, there’s “And Then You’re Dead,” a scientific investigation into novel ways to die by Cody Cassidy and Paul Doherty.

The authors explore what would happen if you were eaten by a shark or if you fell into a black hole, but some of the deadly scenarios explored in the book speak to specific New York-centric anxieties — such as elevator horror stories.

Imagine you’re in an elevator near the top of a Midtown skyscraper. The car lurches. A cable snaps. And the metal box goes screaming down the shaft for 60 stories.

Certain death, right?

Believe it or not, you’d have a pretty good chance of survival. Most elevators today have safety brakes that stop them, making a free fall unlikely. But if it did happen, you probably wouldn’t die a “horrible, flattened death,” as the authors write.

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