Could the end of corrupt Democratic machine politics be upon us?

Could the end of corrupt Democratic machine politics be upon us?
Image: Sherry V Smith/Shutterstock via LU Staff

We can thank Jill Stein and her hopeless recount effort for bringing about at least some positive change in our election system. In the face of incontrovertible evidence of voter fraud in Michigan’s most populous county, the Michigan House passed a much-needed voter ID bill. Unfortunately, the Michigan Senate will probably not vote on the bill this session. Pray that they get to it in the New Year.

The bill is long overdue though it won’t fix the particular problem discovered during the Michigan recount. Here’s what happened: When state officials reviewed the Michigan vote tally they began to notice an odd trend at polling places found mostly in Wayne County, the heavily Democratic area where Detroit is located. At some polling places more ballots were cast than names checked off the voter rolls. The problem was particularly pronounced in Detroit, where 247 of the city’s 662 voting precincts counted more ballots than voters. The city was rife with broken seals on ballot boxes, a strong indicator that ballots were either added, removed, or swapped out. According to a spokesman for Michigan’s Secretary of State, election staff attributed irregularities at polling places in Detroit to human error. Apparently there’s a lot more “human error” in big corrupt cities than in other places.

“There’s always going to be small problems to some degree, but we didn’t expect the degree of problem we saw in Detroit. This isn’t normal,” said Krista Haroutunian, chairwoman of the Wayne County Board of Canvassers. I’d venture to say that she’s likely wrong on that point. This degree of suspicious irregularity is probably very normal — for Detroit.

The excess ballots should be considered the absolute minimum level of cheating. There may have been other forms of chicanery layered on top of that — voter impersonation, for example, or non-citizens voting. Those types of voter fraud are more difficult to detect, especially when people in power have a vested interest in turning a blind eye. Liberals will deny that any such thing took place, but of course they’re also denying the blatant ballot-stuffing, sheepishly explaining it as “human error.” The lesson to be learned here is that Democrats always deny and minimize voter fraud when they’re the ones behind it — which happens to be most of the time. Their denials are nothing but meaningless noise.

What then can voter ID law do to clean up this mess? Not much. Voter ID is intended to stop voters from misrepresenting themselves not crooked poll workers from fiddling with the ballots after they’ve been cast. Voter ID is not enough. The real solution to the problem of voter fraud is to break the backs of the corrupt urban Democratic machines that run most of our big cities. That won’t be easy of course, and it will be downright impossible as long as Loretta Lynch and her Department of “Just-Us” is around to protect them. The current administration views any effort to restore integrity to our chaotic elections as a furtive attempt at disenfranchising minority voters. Apparently not allowing minorities to cheat is a form of racial oppression.

Not that I expect Senator Jeff Sessions, Trump’s nominee for attorney general, to single-handedly squash the corruption. I would however like to see him get out of the way so that state-level officials — attorneys general, inspectors general, secretaries of state, or whoever — can conduct some real investigations and start tossing fraudsters in jail where they belong.

Just don’t expect the corrupt Democratic machines to go softly into the night. They will sue, they will protest, and they will slander good people with spurious accusations of racism. They will make those of us who care about electoral integrity wonder if it’s really worth the fight. I assure you, it is.

We don’t have much time. There are midterm elections in two years and another presidential election two years after that. If the Democrats learned anything from their 2016 debacle it’s that they didn’t cheat nearly enough. Next time they’ll really cheat their asses off — worse than Bill Belichick, I mean.

Cheating is a longstanding tradition within the Democratic Party dating back to New York’s Tammany Hall. Some of their world-class cheaters have included Lyndon Johnson in Texas, Richard Daley in Chicago, and Honey Fitz in Boston. They’ve elevated cheating to an art form.

In 1965 we passed the Voting Rights Act which enabled federal officials to crack down on corrupt Democrats in the rural South who engaged in voter intimidation, while conveniently doing nothing about corrupt Democrats in the urban North who engaged in voter fraud — and sometimes voter intimidation as well. Though the law reeked of northern hegemonism, it was sold to a naïve public as a sincere effort to keep election officials honest. It was the age-old story of our nation — we northerners using the federal government as the means, and racism as the pretext, to force our will upon southerners. Sure, there was a problem in the South; but there was a similar problem in the North, and the federal government didn’t post outsiders at our polling places to babysit us. We northerners were permitted to run our own elections, which were then, just as they are now, hopelessly tainted with corruption. Southerners, on the other hand, were placed under some “adult” supervision — by which I mean Yankee supervision.

Voter fraud is very real. Anyone who tells you otherwise either benefits from it or is simply foolish. I’ve noticed that a curious kind of circular logic surrounds the crime of voter fraud — one that doesn’t apply to other kinds of crime. The fraud deniers refuse to consider any incidents of voter fraud, because no one has proven to their satisfaction that it ever happens more than a few times per election cycle in disparate locations. Mere “anecdotes,” they say. They then cite a lack of convictions for voter fraud as proof that it never happens. I wonder if it ever occurs to them that there aren’t many convictions because no one is on the lookout for it and anyone who tries to stop it is smeared as a racist?

Take Alan Schulkin, for example. He’s the Commissioner of Elections for Manhattan and a liberal Democrat. He was caught on tape admitting that he ’s personally witnessed two types of voter fraud with disturbing regularity — absentee ballot fraud and voter busing—though he’s done nothing about it.

Mayor Bill de Blasio later demanded Schulkin’s resignation, not for tolerating such hijinks but for suggesting that it exists at all. “He’s supposed to be guaranteeing maximum voter participation and his statements and his values obviously indicate he’s not trying to do that,” said de Blasio. Oh, silly me, I thought his job had something to do with safeguarding the integrity of elections. If that’s no longer the aim of the Commissioner of Elections, if “maximum participation” is the goal, then I suppose he should be trying to get children, non-citizens, and incarcerated people to vote too. He should also be letting people vote as many times as they wish. Did Bill de Blasio mean maximum legal participation? He didn’t say that, and in any case, talking about voter fraud does nothing to threaten legal access to the ballot box. Regardless, Alan Schulkin cannot be accused of stymieing participation, legal or otherwise, because he did nothing to stop the voter fraud he admitted to seeing on his watch.

Examples of voter fraud abound. In Indiana, the state police are investigating the Indiana Voter Registration Project for running what appears to be a massive absentee ballot scam in 56 counties. Stay tuned for some final resolution on that one. A CBS affiliate in Los Angeles found 265 deceased Californians who had apparently voted from beyond the grave. In Virginia, the Public Interest Legal Foundation discovered 1,046 non-citizens on the voter rolls in just the eight counties that responded to their request. In Wisconsin, a Hillary Clinton surrogate bragged on camera about busing voters around to vote at multiple polling places.

Slaying this beast won’t be easy but with a new president, a new attorney general, and a healthy sense of public outrage there is a glimmer of hope. We will have to resist the urge to rest on our laurels, content that voter fraud is no big deal simply because Trump won despite it. This is about more than just one election. As a matter of fact it’s about more than political victories. It’s about principle.

Benny Huang

Benny Huang

Benny Huang is a lonely conservative in the very liberal Pioneer Valley of Massachusetts. Born in Taiwan, he came to the United States at a young age. He also blogs at Patriot Update.


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