Former agent: Border smugglers’ intel network more effective than U.S. government’s

Former agent: Border smugglers’ intel network more effective than U.S. government’s

[Ed. – Not a surprise at all, given the numerous reports of inadequate resources, and the thoroughly documented problem of denied access to public lands for CBP, local sheriffs, and other tactical agencies.  The smugglers don’t have to obey regulations in that regard.  Too often, our own law enforcement people are sitting ducks.  Moreover, the Obama administration makes a practice of implementing policies secretly, in such a way that the right left of an agency can have no idea what the left hand is doing.  Smugglers don’t suffer under that handicap either.]

Drug smugglers and human traffickers “have a very effective intelligence gathering system” that is “much more effective than what we have in the U.S. government,” former U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent A. J. Irwin said Wednesday during a panel discussion at the National Press Club in Washington.

The discussion highlighted recent statistics from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) agency showing a dramatic ten-fold increase in the number of illegal immigrants claiming asylum when they reach the U.S. border since 2009.

Irwin said that smugglers quickly find out about changes in U.S. law or policy and then move to exploit them. …

“Smuggling organizations, whether it be narcotics or people, they have a very effective intelligence gathering system,” he continued.

“And I say this, I get criticized a lot, it’s much more effective than what we have in the U.S. government because they will share the information amongst organizations and then they move people for each other and share the profits.”

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