Black activists occupy police union offices in NYC, D.C., demand end to protection for brutal cops

Black activists occupy police union offices in NYC, D.C., demand end to protection for brutal cops
Image via Democracy Now!

AMY GOODMAN: Right now in New York City and in Washington, D.C., activists are attempting to shut down the offices of two major police unions: the Fraternal Order of Police and the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association. In D.C., activists with Black Youth Project 100 and Black Lives Matter have locked themselves to the steps of the Fraternal Order of Police with chains. In New York City, activists with Million Hoodies and BYP 100 have locked themselves to each other using PVC pipes at the entrance of the PBA. The activists are demanding police officers stop paying dues to the private unions, which they accuse of defending officers accused of brutality.

For more, we go directly to Washington, D.C., to speak with Samantha Master, who is a member of the BYP 100 at the protest. Samantha, what’s happening right now?

SAMANTHA MASTER: Hi, Amy. Thank you so much for having us on. And so, right now, we are standing outside of the Steven Young legislative office of the Fraternal Order of Police, where we are demanding that police give us freedom—that the state give us freedom now and that police officers stop paying dues to the FOP and all police unions, as they are pushing active legislation that would make the—that would make—will continue to further protest—protesters who are targeted by police as committing hate crimes. And anything—any folks who are targeting—any folks who are—any—I’m so sorry. What’s happening right now is that protesters are blocking the streets to demand that police officers stop paying dues to the Fraternal Order of Police.

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