Arkansas: A landmine for the EOD record books?

Arkansas: A landmine for the EOD record books?
Confederate Civil War landmines from the collection of Mr. Steve Phillips. (Image: Screen grab of video posted by Steve Phillips, YouTube. See: "Confederate Land Mines Civil War Steve Phillips"; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XCGKrqw_wc)

[Ed. – This is pretty interesting.  The mechanically fused landmine was invented and first used by the Confederacy in the American Civil War.  Looks like this guy found one of the earliest undetonated devices — and drove 65 miles with it in his vehicle, strapped down with a seatbelt.  Apparently he found it in Danville, in Yell County northwest of Little Rock (shades of True Grit, huh?).  Hard to say what it was doing there; no major battles were fought in the immediate area, although there may have been Confederate fortifications there prior to the Union recapture of Little Rock in 1863.]

Police in Hot Springs, Arkansas, evacuated about 20 homes after a man mistook a Civil War-era landmine for a cannonball and took it home this week. The US Air Force Bomb Squad has safely detonated the landmine, the AP reports. Matt Bell says he was doing excavation work when he dug up what he thought was a cannonball Wednesday near Danville. He he put the 32-pound land mine in his pickup’s backseat, buckled it in with a seatbelt, and drove 65 miles to his home in Hot Springs.

After researching pictures of Civil War-era weapons and talking with a Civil War historian, the man called police Thursday to say he thought he found a landmine with a pressure sensor fuse. Hot Springs Police spokesperson Kirk Zaner says authorities evacuated nearby homes and contacted an Air Force bomb squad, which X-rayed the device, found what could be explosives inside, and later detonated the explosive at a local landfill.

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