Obama’s ‘deal’ with Iran actually REDUCES reporting requirements for IAEA watchdog

Obama’s ‘deal’ with Iran actually REDUCES reporting requirements for IAEA watchdog
Red line master. (Image: NBC video via Jihad Watch)

[Ed. – So, the “unprecedentedly intrusive” inspections — which, BTW, involve Iran submitting her own samples, because IAEA isn’t allowed to go in and collect them — won’t be held up to any public accounting.  IAEA doesn’t have to report as much as it had to a year ago about its findings.  I feel better already.]

IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano revealed on Monday morning that the P5+1 nuclear deal signed by the United States but not Iran, has significantly reduced what the UN Agency is supposed to report publicly about Iran’s nuclear activities.

On February 26 the IAEA published its first report since Iran supposedly came into compliance with the nuclear deal and received sanctions relief in return. Many observers were surprised that the report excluded information that had been included in every other report for years. Amano explained away the criticism by declaring that the nuclear deal reduced the reporting requirements that existed before.

The explanation is in tension with how the administration long characterized the nuclear deal to Congress, journalists, and the public. The White House and State Department went all-in on transparency measures: after U.S. negotiators gave up trying to get Iran to destroy any of its uranium infrastructure, the administration declared there would at least be unprecedented insight into all Iranian nuclear activities. In a January 16th statement, Secretary of State John Kerry claimed “the IAEA now has visibility and accountability of the entire supply chain that supports Iran’s nuclear program, from start to finish – from uranium mines and mills to centrifuge manufacturing and operation.”

But like so much of what comes out of the administration the visibility claim was a lie.

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