Animal brought back to life after spending 30 years frozen

Animal brought back to life after spending 30 years frozen
This undated image released by Bob Goldstein and Vicki Madden taken with an electron microscope, shows a micro-animal "tardigrade" also known as a water bear, at the UNC in Chapel Hill, N.C. In Jan. 2015, scientists found the DNA of a tardigrade in Antarctica's Lake Vostok, located in an area considered the most remote place on Earth. The mostly freshwater lake is buried under miles of ice, and hasn’t been near open air for 15 million years, exciting astronomers who search for possible forms of life on other planets. (AP Photo/Bob Goldstein & Vicki Madden, UNC Chapel Hill)

Researchers have successfully revived microscopic creatures that had been kept frozen for 30 years.

Tardigrades, also known as waterbears or moss piglets, are tiny water-dwelling organisms. They’re segmented, with eight legs, and measure 1mm in length.

Scientists at at Japan’s National Institute of Polar Research retrieved the creatures from a frozen moss sample collected in Antarctica in 1983. The sample had been stored at −20 °C for just over three decades.

Two waterbears were resuscitated. One of them died after 20 days, but the other went on to successfully reproduce with a third specimen hatched from a frozen egg.

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