What was Microsoft’s hidden agenda in designing Solitaire, Minesweeper, and FreeCell?

What was Microsoft’s hidden agenda in designing Solitaire, Minesweeper, and FreeCell?

If you haven’t ever played Solitaire, Minesweeper, Hearts or FreeCell, it’s safe to say you’re in the minority. These simple Windows games have probably caused more lost worker hours than anything short of a worldwide coffee shortage. Whichever one was your favorite, the temptation to take just one more go at beating them — to get a faster time or a better score — was hard to ignore.

But as fun as these games were, they weren’t actually designed for entertainment. At least not in their Windows incarnations.

The oldest of the four, Microsoft Solitaire, was first added to Windows 3.0 in 1990. Although the game (sometimes called “Patience”) has existed since the late 1700s, this digital version seemed to be demonstrating that in the future we would no longer require a physical deck to play simple card games. But that’s not what it was doing at all. Its real aim was far more modest: it was teaching mouse-fluency by stealth.

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