EPA ‘disappears’ ALL 191 IMAGES of Gold King Mine disaster from its website

EPA ‘disappears’ ALL 191 IMAGES of Gold King Mine disaster from its website
The Animas River, where orange is the new blue. (Image: CNN iReport)

[Ed. – Most transparent administration in human history — just not in a good way.  Anthony Watts’s update accompanies a must-read essay on the disaster by Paul Driessen.]

WUWT contributor Russell Cook notes:

EPA has scrubbed all 191 photos off their photo log / list view pages http://www.epaosc.org/site/image_listview.aspx?site_id=11082 . If the #1 item at this page is an accurate indicator, the scrub took place on Sunday.

I had visited that site last week when the event first happened and I wrote my first report, and I can confirm that the photos below, plus many more, are now gone.

What could have rendered all those photos, which were previously labeled “Security Level: Public”, as now not for public viewing? …

[Bonus excerpt from the Driessen essay. – Ed.]

This time the White House was silent, and Democrats and eco-activists rushed to defend EPA and shift the blame to mining and mining companies. EPA officials made statementsthey would never use if a private company had caused the blowout: EPA had simply “miscalculated” how much water had backed up. It was just trying to stick a pipe into the top of the mine to safely pump liquid out for treatment. We were “very careful.” Contaminants “are flowing too fast to be an immediate health threat.” The river is already “restoring itself” back to pre-spill levels, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy insisted.

The evidence strongly suggests that EPA never studied or calculated anything, had no operations plan vetted and approved by state officials or mining experts, was not trying to install a pipe – and was grossly careless and negligent. Toxic sludge was carried and deposited along hundreds of miles, contaminating water and riverbeds, where it will be stirred up for years during every heavy rainfall and snowmelt.

Mining engineers told me the prudent approach would have been to push or drill a 4-inch pipe through the rubble into the mine, to determine the water pressure, toxicity and extent of water backup in the mine – and then build a strong cofferdam below the portal – before proceeding. Simply removing the debris was stupid, dangerous and negligent, they said. It will take years now to correct the damage and assess costs.

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