You won’t believe what was in the window of the site of the Chattanooga shooting

Among the many horrifying images carried by the media yesterday following a crazed gunman’s attack on two military career centers in Chattanooga was the one below, showing the glass doors of one of the facilities riddled with bullet holes. The pattern of the holes, concentrated in one section of one door, reveals that the shots were fired in rapid succession.

glass doors

But bullet holes weren’t all that was discovered in the aftermath of yesterday’s assault. Study the screen cap above once again and see if you can find something as senseless as the heart-rendering reminder of the attack itself, which claimed four Marines.

Do you notice the new detail? If not, have a look at the tweet below, posted yesterday at 2:05 p.m.

As noted at LU last October, a report by the Crime Prevention Research Center found that 92% of mass shootings in the United States from 2009 to 2014 occurred in so-called “gun-free zones.” In the shootings at Florida State University a month later, a person on campus who had served as a combat Army veteran “had a clear shot at the shooter,” but was helpless to act because FSU is a “gun free zone.”

There is no guarantee that some of yesterday’s victims could have been saved had the Marines inside the building been armed. Still, it’s hard to see how scrapping a feel-good policy in favor of a realistic one wouldn’t have improved the chances.

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Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy has written for The Blaze, HotAir, NewsBusters, Weasel Zippers, Conservative Firing Line, RedCounty, and New York’s Daily News. He has one published novel, Hot Rain, (G. P. Putnam’s Sons), and has been a guest on Radio Vice Online with Jim Vicevich, The Alana Burke Show, Smart Life with Dr. Gina, and The George Espenlaub Show.


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