Yale U. class dishonors fellow alum and American hero — but you won’t believe how

Yale U. class dishonors fellow alum and American hero — but you won’t believe how

If you stroll across the Yale University campus in New Haven, Conn., you will eventually come upon the statue of Nathan Hale, class of 1773. Hale is celebrated in bronze not only because he was an alumnus but because of his patriotism and unparalleled courage as a soldier during the Revolutionary War. As he stood on the gallows about to be hanged as a spy by British forces in 1776, he uttered these immortal words, “I only regret that I have but one life to give for my country.”

And now the class of ’75 (that’s 1975) has chosen to remember Hale again, this time as a bobblehead. Little likenesses of Hale, modeled on the statue, right down to the ropes that bind the hands and feet, were offered as a party favor at the class’s recent reunion.

Credit: Eric Metaxas, Facebook
Credit: Eric Metaxas, Facebook

Dave Urbanski of The Blaze notes that current issue of the Yale Alumni Magazine is advertising the 8-inch-high action figure, which is available to anyone with $29.99. The ad carries the advice, “[T]he class has more than one bobblehead to give, and you can buy them online.”bobbleheadPutting aside the tastelessness of a bobblehead depicting a man who has hanged, author Eric Metaxas, himself a Yalie, asks readers to try imagining the liberal reaction to casting ther figures as bobbleheads. He offers as suggestions the Prophet Muhammad, Matthew Shepard, or Trayvon Martin, but the list is fairly lengthy.

Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy has written for The Blaze, HotAir, NewsBusters, Weasel Zippers, Conservative Firing Line, RedCounty, and New York’s Daily News. He has one published novel, Hot Rain, (G. P. Putnam’s Sons), and has been a guest on Radio Vice Online with Jim Vicevich, The Alana Burke Show, Smart Life with Dr. Gina, and The George Espenlaub Show.


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