Texas approves building state-managed gold depository

Texas approves building state-managed gold depository
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[Ed. – And pulling $1 billion in state holdings out of the federal system, to be stored in the state facility.  This is actually pretty big, and reminiscent of states and localities trying to protect themselves against the often whimsical, eccentric monetary policy of the FDR years.  Emphasis in original.]

Texas has enacted a Bill to repatriate $1 billion of gold from The NY Fed’s vaults to a newly established state gold bullion depository…”People have this image of Texas as big and powerful … so for a lot of people, this is exactly where they would want to go with their gold,” and the Bill includes a section to prevent forced seizure from the Federal Government. …

In addition, Texas will repatriate $1 billion worth of bullion from the Federal Reserve in New York to the new facility once completed.

On the surface the bill looks rather innocent, but its implications are far reaching. HB 483, “relating to the establishment and administration of a state bullion depository” to store gold and silver coins, was introduced by state Rep. Giovanni Capriglione.

Capriglione told the Star-Telegram:

“We are not talking Fort Knox. But when I first announced this, I got so many emails and phone calls from people literally all over the world who said they want to store their gold … in a Texas depository. People have this image of Texas as big and powerful … so for a lot of people, this is exactly where they would want to go with their gold.” …

[…]

So far most of the attention has focused on the part of the depository and the big institutions. However, the bill also includes a provision to prevent seizure, which is important for private parties who want to avoid another 1933 style confiscation of their bullion by Federal authorities.

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