Suddenly, ‘news’ that CIA, Mossad collaborated to kill top Hezbollah figure during Bush years

Suddenly, ‘news’ that CIA, Mossad collaborated to kill top Hezbollah figure during Bush years

[Ed. – Really?  This comes out right now?  The “new” book by Robert B. Baer cited in the article was actually published in October — and it doesn’t say there was collaboration.  Baer and unnamed others have been gotten to confirm it, apparently.  But the timing is distinctly odd, given the recent dust-ups between Hezbollah and the IDF.  You might almost think someone was trying to add fuel to the fire.  Notice how the finger points at an event in the Bush years, and not at cooperation since Obama took office, although there undoubtedly has been such cooperation.]

On Feb. 12, 2008, Imad Mughniyah, Hezbollah’s international operations chief, walked on a quiet nighttime street in Damascus after dinner at a nearby restaurant. Not far away, a team of CIA spotters in the Syrian capital was tracking his movements.

As Mughniyah approached a parked SUV, a bomb planted in a spare tire on the back of the vehicle exploded, sending a burst of shrapnel across a tight radius. He was killed instantly. …

The United States has never acknowledged participation in the killing of Mughniyah, which Hezbollah blamed on Israel. Until now, there has been little detail about the joint operation by the CIA and Mossad to kill him, how the car bombing was planned or the exact U.S. role. …

In a new book, “The Perfect Kill: 21 Laws for Assassins,” former CIA officer Robert B. Baer writes how he had considered assassinating Mughniyah but apparently never got the opportunity. He notes, however, that CIA “censors” — the agency’s Publications Review Board — screened his book and “I’ve unfortunately been unable to write about the true set-piece plot against” Mughniyah.

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