Cops break into your home without a warrant and attack you. Can you shoot them?

Cops break into your home without a warrant and attack you. Can you shoot them?

A case in point is a situation that occurred back on Sept. 30, 2011 in Missouri.   Jason and Laura Hagan, who home school their three children, were the subject of an investigation by Child Protective Services alleging that their home was messy.  …

While the Hagan’s complied with the first inspection they refused when the social worker returned for another “inspection”, this time accompanied by  Captain David Glidden and Sheriff Darren White of the Nodaway County Sheriff’s office. …

The Hagan’s were well within their rights to deny entry to the shocktroopers that the social worker came with.  Alas, the shock-troopers did not like the Hagan’s standing up for themselves and as such turned violent.  First they grabbed Laura by the wrist and pulled her off her porch. …

The officers then bum-rushed the door and forced their way in, pepper spraying both Hagans in the face repeatedly while Jason was tasered multiple times.

The officers continued their assault by smacking Laura in the face so hard her glasses were knocked off and literally kicking Jason while he was down numerous times. …

[M]ake no mistake, what Captain David Glidden and Sheriff Darren White did that day was illegal.  It took a year but the court ruled that the actions of Glidden and White  where completely out of line and the trumped up charges against the Hagan’s were ludicrous and without merit. …

That is why more states should follow Indiana’s lead and make it legal to defend yourself against crooked cops who would murder you in their frenzied rage should you dare not consent to illegal searches.  Back in 2012 lawmakers made changes to the Castle Doctrine in which the exception for crooked cops was removed.

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