How did women get birth control before Obama?

How did women get birth control before Obama?

Before Obamacare, a woman could go to a doctor and get birth control. She often had to pay or make a copayment for contraception. But in the 2014 political lexicon, that means she had no access.

On Monday, the Supreme Court issued its 5-4 Hobby Lobby decision, which recognized family-owned corporations’ religious right to not offer contraception mandated under the Affordable Care Act in their employee health insurance plans. In her dissenting opinion, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg charged that the ruling would “deny legions of women who do not hold their employers’ religious beliefs access to contraceptive coverage that the ACA would otherwise secure.”

The Obama administration broadly prescribed what constituted health insurance coverage in 2012 when the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced that contraception constituted essential preventive care. Hence, under Obamacare, birth control is exempt from copayments and mandatory in most employer-sponsored health plans.

What if employers have deeply held religious objections against contraceptive methods that they consider to be abortion-inducing? Surely, the Obama administration expected resistance.

It came from Hobby Lobby CEO David Green, who, as a devout Christian, had been providing health care to his 13,000 full-time workers for years. The company plan included contraception — but not four methods that Green and his family believe “risk killing an embryo.” In a court brief, Hobby Lobby objected to being forced to be “complicit in abortion.”

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