Director: Godzilla a ‘god,’ ‘nature’s mascot’ restoring man-disrupted balance

Director: Godzilla a ‘god,’ ‘nature’s mascot’ restoring man-disrupted balance

[Ed. – Resistance is futile.]

Your version of Godzilla seems to be more rooted in current events, and centers on mankind’s tenuous relationship with nature, and the environment.

Yeah. Man vs. Nature is the predominant theme of the film, and I always tried to go back to that imagery. At the beginning when they find the fossils, it was important to me that they didn’t just find them—it was caused by our abuse of the planet. We deserved it, in a way. So there’s this rainforest with a big scar in the landscape with this quarry, slave labor, and a Western company. You have to ask yourself, “What does Godzilla represent?” The thing we kept coming up with is that he’s a force of nature, and if nature had a mascot, it would be Godzilla. So what do the other creatures represent? They represent man’s abuse of nature, and the idea is that Godzilla is coming to restore balance to something mankind has disrupted. …

We are seeing a lot of films dealing with mankind vs. nature—take Noah, which the filmmakers have gone on record admitting is a global warming allegory about mankind’s ravaging of the Earth.

All stories are about something else. You examine this stuff deep enough and you eventually get into the realm of, “Why do we tell stories?” One of the theories is that we’re born into the world and you know nothing and you haven’t left your tribe but the elders have, so you ask them, “What’s it like out there? How did you win? Who lost?” So they tell you all this stuff, and it’s equipment to live your life by. In this day and age, it’s turned into entertainment, but the desire to have a deeper meaning is still there. As we got into it, the message of Godzilla turned into, “We should let nature take its course and shouldn’t try to control it.” Stories have been used for a long time to smuggle the morals of the day inside them, and today, people are worried about global warming.

Continue reading →


Commenting Policy

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse. Read more.

You may use HTML in your comments. Feel free to review the full list of allowed HTML here.

Facebook Comments

Disqus Comments