1,100 words misrepresenting Tal Fortgang piece as ‘defense of white privilege’

1,100 words misrepresenting Tal Fortgang piece as ‘defense of white privilege’

[Ed. – If you can’t beat ’em, lie about what they said.]

A Princeton freshman pens a defense of white privilege and gets famous. But why him? And why now?

By now you have probably heard about Tal Fortgang, the Princeton freshman whose manifesto in defense of white privilege has become an overnight viral sensation. …

Why is Tal Fortgang a thing in the first place? Why did an essay he published in the Princeton Tory suddenly become a national news story? Why was it republished by Time magazine? People have been writing regrettable college op-eds since the beginning of time. So why him? And why now?

Partly, it’s a reflection of the peculiar moment in history we occupy. The past year has seen Paula Deen, Phil Robertson, Donald Sterling and the #CancelColbert movement all become the biggest stories of their respective news cycles. White privilege, for a lot of reasons, is a huge point of contention these days.

Fortgang is far from the first person to insist there’s nothing wrong with white privilege. Nor is he the most forceful or incendiary. Nor does he, for that matter, present a particularly compelling vision for why white privilege is as totally chill as he believes it to be. Something else must be at work here. …

What really draws conservatives to Fortgang is an idea about what young people like him represent — that they don’t need to reassess their ideological assumptions on everything from gay marriage and immigration to inequality and systemic racism; that their attitudes actually aren’t out of touch with the times; that there’s still a future for their paleolithic worldview, because there are young people to carry that torch.

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