On gay marriage, intolerance cuts both ways

On gay marriage, intolerance cuts both ways

Gay marriage has come to many jurisdictions in this country, and will soon come to all of them. But the intolerance I worried about has been manifested most conspicuously not by conservatives but by the side that’s winning, the side that likes to call itself liberal.

Conservatives are attacked as homophobes, Christianity derided as backward. Politicians, celebrities, and athletes who run afoul of the new orthodoxy must abase themselves in penance. If they refuse, witch hunts are launched, no matter how innocuous the transgressor. When Miss California gushed that marriage was “between a man and a woman,” one of the judges, a gay blogger, called her vile names and wrote about ripping off her tiara—for enunciating a position supported by a majority of Californians, and which Barack Obama would cling to for another three years.

In 2004 and 2008, both major political parties’ nominees embraced the mantra that marriage “was between a man and a woman.” (This couldn’t be the answer because it was the question.) Only after Joe Biden blurted out his actual view in 2012 did Obama find the gumption to follow suit. Public opinion had changed by then, so it was no profile in courage. Most disturbingly, liberals immediately began attacking the character of anyone or any institution at odds with their newfound creed.

The patriarch of “Duck Dynasty” calling homosexuality a sin? Tell network suits to suspend him. (They did.) Unearth an old $1,000 contribution by Mozilla’s CEO to the anti-gay marriage side of California’s Proposition 8 fight in 2008? Threaten Mozilla to force him to quit. (He did). Learn that House Republicans have retained a respected litigator to defend DOMA in federal courts? Urge his law firm to forsake their client. (The firm caved, and the lawyer went elsewhere.)


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