Egyptian magazine: During Passover Jews eat matza laced with blood of non-Jews

Egyptian magazine: During Passover Jews eat matza laced with blood of non-Jews

[Ed. – You can spot them because of their horns.]

On the occasion of Passover, Egyptian journalist Firnas Hafzi wrote in an article titled “The Jewish Bloodsuckers On Passover” that Jews kill non-Jews during this holiday in order to use their blood in preparing matzas. Quoting researchers who describe this alleged Jewish custom, she listed many alleged cases, including the 1840 Damascus blood libel. She added that as part of their efforts to disassociate themselves from these murders, the Jews wrote stories and made films about vampires, or else blamed their crimes on deranged individuals. The murders that the Jews are known to have committed as part of their Passover rituals, she said, are “a drop in the ocean compared to the Jewish crimes that no one knows about” and thousands of children and adults who have vanished around the world were likely victims of these Jewish rituals.

The article, accompanied by reproductions of well-known antisemitic illustrations and paintings, was published in the Egyptian monthly magazine Al-Kibar, which was founded in July 2013 following the fall of the Muslim Brotherhood regime; its articles deal mostly with the economy, art, and society.

The claim that Jews use blood in preparing their matzas was also made on the website Cairodar.com, which describes itself as the “educational portal” of the Egyptian daily Al-Yawm Al-Sabi’. An article titled “The Bloodsucking Jews Kill Children And Offer Them Up As A Sacrifice,” which purported to reveal “the terrifying truth about the Jews,” stated that one of their Passover rituals is baking matzas with human blood, and that rabbis slaughter children as part of witchcraft rituals.

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