Obamacare to increase individual-market premiums by average of 41%

Obamacare to increase individual-market premiums by average of 41%

One of the fundamental flaws of the Affordable Care Act is that, despite its name, it makes health insurance more expensive. Today, the Manhattan Institute released the most comprehensive analysis yet conducted of premiums under Obamacare for people who shop for coverage on their own. Here’s what we learned. In the average state, Obamacare will increase underlying premiums by 41 percent. As we have long expected, the steepest hikes will be imposed on the healthy, the young, and the male. And Obamacare’s taxpayer-funded subsidies will primarily benefit those nearing retirement—people who, unlike the young, have had their whole lives to save for their health-care needs.

41 states, plus D.C., will experience premium hikes

If you’ve been following this space, you know that I and two of my Manhattan Institute colleagues—Yevgeniy Feyman and Paul Howard—have developed an interactive map where you can see how Obamacare affects premiums in your state. (If you ever need to find it, simply Google “Obamacare cost map.”)

In September, we released the first iteration of the map, which included data from 13 states and the District of Columbia. We only had data from a few mostly-blue states because the remainder were mostly participating in the federal exchange, and the federal exchange—for reasons we now understand more fully—hadn’t released any premium information at that time. That analysis found that underlying premiums would increase by 24 percent in those 13 states plus D.C.

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