Fed judge: AZ, KS can require proof of citizenship for voters

Fed judge: AZ, KS can require proof of citizenship for voters

In a big victory for election integrity, Arizona and Kansas — led by their Secretaries of State, Ken Bennett and Kris Kobach — have obtained an order from a federal judge allowing them to enforce their proof-of-citizenship requirement for voter registration.

In a decision issued on March 19, Judge Eric Melgren of the federal district court of Kansas found that the refusal of federal election authorities to add state-specific instructions to the federal voter-registration form notifying residents of Arizona and Kansas that they have to provide proof that they are U.S. citizens to complete their registration is “unlawful and in excess of its statutory authority.”

This long saga started in 2004, when Arizona’s residents overwhelmingly passed a referendum requiring proof of citizenship to register to vote. In 2011, the Kansas legislature passed a similar requirement. The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC), which is responsible for administering the federal voter-registration form established by the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 (NVRA), had initially refused to amend the state-specific instructions for Arizona and Kansas on the federal registration form.

A large number of liberal advocacy groups, including Project Vote and Common Cause, sued Arizona over the requirement in a case that ended up before the U.S. Supreme Court. In 2013 in Arizona v. Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc., the Court issued a confused opinion in which it said that Arizona must “accept and use” the federal voter registration form, despite Arizona’s citizenship requirement.

However, the Court also laid out a blueprint for how Arizona could enforce its requirement: The state could resubmit its request to the EAC and if the federal agency refused to include the instruction, Arizona could sue the EAC under the Administrative Procedure Act and request a writ of mandamus from a court ordering the EAC to make the change.

Continue reading →


Commenting Policy

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse. Read more.

You may use HTML in your comments. Feel free to review the full list of allowed HTML here.

Facebook Comments

Disqus Comments